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(Click the pic for a larger view.)

I’ve seen London and I’ve seen France, plus a whole bunch of ladies underpants-in store windows that is. Thing is, oddly, the most risqué undies I’ve seen while traveling London, Paris-should I mention Ireland- has been right here in Ludwigsburg, Germany, but I’m not gonna split hairs over the matter.

Once I tore my vision away from the panties it became apparent that a city lined by low buildings with low profiles of less than six or so stories high gives light to the people who live there. I’ve no good answer, not for now, for those who protest about the agonizing cost of transport should cities sprawl beyond reason via low profiles not to mention the pollution caused by the added miles of commute.  Example: how could New York City be spread out? The countryside would morph into houses, roads and gas stations? How could any low city profiles work? This is the question mankind must answer if you ask me.  Why, you might ask? I’ve seen the light after visiting London, Ireland, Paris and now Ludwigsburg, Germany: that’s the answer.

 

This is Dublin, Ireland.

A low profile is key for any city. The trick to a happy populace is to not have high-rise buildings blocking the sunlight, flat-out period, end of story. It’s an abstract concept but real. Urban streets  lined by four to six-story high buildings allow the sun in, the trees to grow and the people to breathe easy. Many consider themselves ‘Urbanity,’ but I say most of those who do have truly forgotten or never experience the freedom vast open skies and spaces can give to the human spirit.

In honor of my cousin, Jed Franquemont, who says I take 1/2 of the globs to get to my point, I will now.*

Think I’ll get off this horse and ride another: my family’s castle. We went to Germany to see it.

It’s a bit large…160 rooms, and kept up by Germany as a come look-see attraction.

Thing is, every man needed a hunting camp so this Duke, Karl Eugen of Wurttemberg, my ancestor, built one. We toured this place of opulence and splendid countryside view.

How is this related to me? Quick and dirty, around 1750 Karl Eugen (1728-1793) became king of the Baden-Ludwigsburg-Wurttemberg region at age 16. This region included much of what is today Germany as well as a small section of France(Alsace). Karl Eugen’s arranged married worked for 3 years before this couple in power decided to part ways forever though not divorced. Karl’s wife moved out of the country. This left Karl Eugen immensely powerful, rich and, well, young for what turned out to be his next ten years of  foot-loose and fancy-free life. This sort of perfect storm that ensued entailed Karl’s money, his power, his love for Italian Opera singers and dancers and the lack of condemns…all this participated the birth of many illegitimate children-sometimes as many as 3 children by one woman- and all of them lacked the real title of heir. Karl looked throughout his kingdom and found a vacant royal title(one whose heirs had died leaving the title and name open.) In 1660 the Von Franquemont castle still stood in Baden but by the mid 1750 it was in ruins and the Von Franquemont’s deceased. Karl Eugen as Duke of the land bought this vacant title and gave the name and title, Von Franquemont, to all of his illegitimate children along with the proclamation of Nobility.

Many statesmen back then thought Karl Eugen, Duke of the Wurttemberg region, was young, wild and crazy, inappropriate, wasteful, a womanizer and fan of radical dance and music.

 

Me? I think it was sorta like the old calling the up and coming(no pun) youth names…Like producers did to Elvis. Did you know cameras were forced to not show Elvis move-wiggle- his legs on TV in fear  that impressionable young ladies might go mad?

anyway…….

Boom! Those with my family name, sans the ‘Von,’ are, in fact, nobility. All by proclamation. How cool is that? But I don’t let it go to my head….

I hardly even think about it….

….unless my toes haven’t been washed or the service is slow. Only the little things get to me.

And my children don’t harp on about being the off-spring of a great-grandson so many times over of a German Duke.

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My daughter wearing her every day ol’ crown.

The entire extended family rarely lets people know unless they don’t ask that we’re Nobility-it’s all kept on the down low.

This is why the next post will be more shots of our ancestor’s castle(s)—as in five— it’s all hush-hush. However, touring one of them with Eberhard, his wife, and with this man was quite unique….

This man! You’ll never guess his claim to fame. All of this and that soon…

Cheers, your humble servant and Great, Great, waaaay Great Grandson of a Duke-

Currently, I have a three book series, The avatar Magic series, published on kindle.

  • This is Jed Franquemont’s review of book one—-
    Everybody knows that I spend inordinate amount of time reading fiction. What I like best is scifi, spies, and sex. My cousin, Gerald Franquemont, has written a novel with me in mind. Avatar Magic is a wonderful read and is available on Kindle for $4.95. Cuz

    has really amazed me with his first novel. I can’t wait for the next one.”  2013

Bk 1-https://www.amazon.com/AVATAR-MAGIC-Avatar-Magic-Book-ebook/dp/B00B0NYO80/

Book one-

Bk 2-https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00KXMIIOK/ref=series_rw_dp_sw

Book two develops the characters, defines their motives and worth, and moves the plot onward to Book three-the final book.

Bk 3-https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B018RX67BW/ref=series_rw_dp_sw

The trilogy makes great holiday reading-a nice Romance and Sci-Fi jaunt around the world

 

Cheers from my bulletin board to you!

Franque23

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I am a first cousin once removed to Edward Curtis.

Edward Curtis spent most of his lifetime photographing Native Americans.

Edward Curtis spent most of his lifetime photographing Native Americans.

The famous Native American photographer was my Grandmother’s first cousin. Because my grandmother gifted some of his work to her children, I have two first plate photo copies of his work hung in my house.

This hangs on our walls,,and we still talk form time to time.

This hangs on our walls,,and this guy and I still talk from time to time.

Works by Edward Curtis hung on the walls of my parents home in Florida, too. I’d stand before them and stare at the faces in the photographs, and sometimes it almost seemed those caught by Curtis’ camera could speak. I’d study the lines on their faces and feel as though I knew how they felt-it was as if I knew their life.

Oddly, but maybe though a strong genetic urge to understand the Native Americans, the same one that drove Edward Curtis on to photograph America’s indigenous people, I spent my childhood days wishing I was an Indian. My brother and I romped around outside dressed as Indian’s with only a simple towel wrapped around our privates held in place by our belts. We terrorized our neighbor’s backyards playing, sensing, wishing we were part of those crafty, savvy  tribes we saw depicted on TV or in the Curtis pictures. Oh, to shoot a bow and to understand the eagle’s cry, this was my fondest hope. At the time, I never thought that any other child felt differently about our indigenous people. I thought everyone wore only towels when they could. Looking back, yeah, no, that wasn’t really happening.

That’s exactly what that cop said, too. “You kids gotta get dressed.”

My dreams were often about being an Indian scout. I’d climb high up in a tree,,, and look for signs of other people, or wild animals. I was always a super scout in those dreams….then I would sleep.

My fascination for the Native American, or indigenous people, was not singular to me- those tendencies ran rampant throughout my family.

My sister, Sharon Franquemont, is an adopted full fledged Lakota. She spent ten years studying and working with the tribe. Sharon went on to help organize a once a year gathering and beating of the drum in Washington D.C.-right on the lawn by the Washington Monument

An aerial view of one of the first gatherings.

An aerial view of one of the first  Native American vigils/gatherings in D.C.

Sharon went on with the vigil, A Prayer Vigil for the Earth*, for ten years and it was still on-going as of 2012. http://www.oneprayer.org/. The gathering was a collective effort to alert our leaders about the World’s need for Peace. At first, it was a small gathering of five to seven tribes that came and set up Tepees in a circle by the Washington monument.

On the lawn, right by the Washington Monument.

On the lawn, right by the Washington Monument.

As I recall, Sharon used her own money and collected more to fly chiefs from various tribes to the site for the first few vigils. The drum would beat for three days and nights, and all the while speakers would take center stage on a 8X8 foot wooden platform and give the lecture they felt had to be shared.

By the end of Sharon’s ten years, tepees were set up by groups that came from Japan, Africa, Europe, heck all around the globe who were seeking world peace …My sister carried on Edward Curtis mission and then some. (I’m gonna leave out how Sharon also worked with the Shumei Institute in Japan and traveled the world over talking about world Peace.-that’s another whole story.)http://www.shumei.org/ )

My brother,  Edward Franquemont, spent ten years living with indigenous people of the Andes.

He is shown here holding me back for my own good, I think.

Ed is shown here holding me back for my own good, I think. Sharon keeps above the fray—but check out the super spring coiled glider snow sled!

Ed was featured in a Nova special-Secret of the lost Empires-the Incas(Secrets Of Lost Empires:The Inca Empire Part 1/6 [Video]) –you can learn about the Incas and see my brother host the show, the first man talking once the narrator stops….it’s so interesting.

My brother , Ed, and his wife, Christine Franquemont, lived in the Andes and raised their two girls in those mountains. They learned to speak the various dialects of the Native People. They both were devoted to helping the cause for the Peruvian Native people and in  particular Ed studied their weaving, the meanings of the threads and design they used, while also translating to the outside world what the process of weaving meant to that society.

My brother, Ed, working a handspindle.

My brother, Ed, working a hand-spindle.

Christine became an authority on the subject of potatoes, the  Peruvian’s main dietary food. Both traveled across the Pond lecturing on their individual expertise-to England, South American and Japan. That was just the way they rolled.

Christine Franquemont in Peru. I can't figure why she's holding my brother's hat? Hats seldom leave bald heads.

Christine Franquemont in Peru. I can’t figure why she’s holding my brother’s hat? Hats seldom leave bald heads.

So there you have it: My sister went all in with the Lakota, and helped organize what became a world-wide gathering at the Washington D.C. Monument that showcased the Native American people and called for world peace; my brother studied the Peruvian Inca culture and brought it to the mainstream via a Nova special. His wife, Christine, studied the Peruvians and loved their culture and land.

Point—Edward Curtis lives on through my family, through my sibling’s efforts, and their interests. They each fought for indigenous people, for their right to exist and continue their beliefs and cultural interests, and for the less fortunate, and so much more. I have to add, my daughter, Kelly Franqueont, now working in impoverished school districts throughout South Africa is also carrying on this tradition of working to help indigenous people.

Kelly's determined to help people learn how to teach, and help children learn.

Kelly’s determined to help people learn how to teach, and help children learn.

Ed and Chris had just returned from Peru for a visit, while I stayed put dreaming of lake time.

Ed and Chris had just returned from Peru for a visit, while I stayed put dreaming of lake time. (Back yard in Micanopy Floirda-1981ish,)

One last thing-wouldn’t you know that Abby Franquemont-my brother’s oldest child-has dedicated years to expounding upon and learning the Peruvian methods of weaving.

She learned form her dad, Ed Franquemont, and from the Peruvians. She is on google.

She learned from her dad, Ed Franquemont, and from the Peruvians, and then from 40 years of practice. She is on google.

https://www.youtube.com/user/afranquemont See Abby here, and learn more about her efforts.

Edward Curtis is dancing somewhere because of Abby’s, Christine’s, Ed’s, Sharon’s and Kelly Franquemont’s accomplishments.

Me, I celebrate them all, too, but I’m a bit different from my siblings- that’s also another story…

http://www.oneprayer.org/History.html

http://www.disclose.tv/…/Secrets_of_Lost_Empires_The…/

Gerald Franquemont
Talk with you later, ...

Talk with you later, … Franque23

*This comment is found by clicking the comment button at the top of the post, but I thought Sharon’s adds so important that I’d * them and include her words here. Sharon’s comment: “Gerry, so heart warming that you were working on this just before the Edward S. Curtis video came across Facebook.  Of course, the Prayer Vigil for the Earth, which was held every year for 20 not 10 years, was far from a 1 person event.  Betsy Stang recommended most of the Native people (extraordinary Wisdom Keepers…I still marvel at who graced our time) and David Berry arranged for our guests to visit State Department, White House, Congress, etc. They were far more politically savvy and active than I was or am. About the 3rd year into our 20 of a 100% voluntary event on the Mall, wonderful volunteers stepped up in DC..Sue, Ben, Bill R.,Ellie R.,  Bill S., Rabiah, Chris Linas and many more helped us organize and erect the Peace Village every year. We remained together for 17 years. The list goes on and on because wonderful beings brought themselves and often their community to join us. After the 4th year, we were ready to retire, but Harry F. Byrd advised us to go on and invite other faiths to join us.  That is how we became an interfaith event.  Although I did contribute financially every year, so did others whose names at their request will be anonymous. Before 9/11, things were very wonderful with the National park Service helping us with permits and understanding. After 9/11, the event became far more difficult. I definitely felt and feel tapped by Edward S. Curtis and always will. Of course, Grandma Franque and all the Franquemonts are in there, too.”

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